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The Book of Famous Quotes: The Complete Collection

 :: 1795-1821, British Poet

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O Solitude! If I must with thee dwell, Let it not be among the jumbled heap of murky buildings
~ John Keats - [Solitude]

 

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Though the most beautiful creature were waiting for me at the end of a journey or a walk; though the carpet were of silk, the curtains of the morning clouds; the chairs and sofa stuffed with cygnet's down; the food manna, the wine beyond claret, the window opening on Winander Mere, I should not feel --or rather my happiness would not be so fine, as my solitude is sublime.
~ John Keats - [Solitude]

 

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Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, and many goodly states and kingdoms seen.
~ John Keats - [Travel and Tourism]

 

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What the imagination seizes as beauty must be the truth.
~ John Keats - [Truth]

 

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Are there not thousands in the world who love their fellows even to the death, who feel the giant agony of the world, and more, like slaves to poor humanity, labor for mortal good?
~ John Keats - [Philanthropists]

 

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Do not all charms fly at the mere touch of cold philosophy? There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: we know her woof, her texture; she is given in the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings, conquer all mysteries by rule and line, empty the haunted air, and gnome mine unweave a rainbow.
~ John Keats - [Philosophers and Philosophy]

 

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Give me books, fruit, French wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by someone I do not know. I admire lolling on a lawn by a water-lilied pond to eat white currants and see goldfish: and go to the fair in the evening if I'm good. There is not hope for that --one is sure to get into some mess before evening.
~ John Keats - [Pleasure]

 

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Poetry should be great and unobtrusive, a thing which enters into one's soul, and does not startle it or amaze it with itself, but with its subject.
~ John Keats - [Poetry and Poets]

 

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Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity --it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.
~ John Keats - [Poetry and Poets]

 

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I would jump down Etna for any public good -- but I hate a mawkish popularity.
~ John Keats - [Popularity]

 

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I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom --one filled with hatreds cannot be vain, neither can he be wise.
~ John Keats - [Pride]

 

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A proverb is not a proverb to you until life has illustrated it.
~ John Keats - [Proverbs]

 

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The Public is a thing I cannot help looking upon as an enemy, and which I cannot address without feelings of hostility.
~ John Keats - [Public]

 

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Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.
~ John Keats - [Quarrels]

 

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Wide sea, that one continuous murmur breeds along the pebbled shore of memory!
~ John Keats - [Sea]

 

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There is nothing stable in the world; uproar's your only music.
~ John Keats - [Security]

 

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I think we may class the lawyer in the natural history of monsters.
~ John Keats - [Law and Lawyers]

 

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My passions are all asleep from my having slumbered till nearly eleven and weakened the animal fiber all over me to a delightful sensation about three degrees on this sight of faintness -- if I had teeth of pearl and the breath of lilies I should call it languor -- but as I am I must call it laziness. In this state of effeminacy the fibers of the brain are relaxed in common with the rest of the body, and to such a happy degree that pleasure has no show of enticement and pain no unbearable frown. Neither poetry, nor ambition, nor love have any alertness of countenance as they pass by me.
~ John Keats - [Laziness]

 

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I have been astonished that men could die martyrs for religion --I have shuddered at it. I shudder no more --I could be martyred for my religion --Love is my religion --I could die for that.
~ John Keats - [Martyrdom]

 

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Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter.
~ John Keats - [Music]

 

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